Boys Can’t Wear Pink? All Girls Want to be Princesses? 20 Kids’ Books That Redefine What’s ‘Normal’

From an early age kids are bombarded with messages that rigidly define gender: Boys like pirates and sports and being rough, and girls are sweet princesses who love all things pink and sparkles. Even many children’s books still promote harmful gender stereotypes for both boys and girls; limiting how they play, dress, and express themselves. …

Source: Boys Can’t Wear Pink? All Girls Want to be Princesses? 20 Kids’ Books That Redefine What’s ‘Normal’

Friday Fodder: Raising Rainbows Scholarship

Consider supporting this scholarship fund.

Raising My Rainbow

During my travels around the nation speaking to different groups and organizations, I fell in love with a school in Greenfield, Massachusetts. The Center School is a progressive, independent day school that offers rigorous education for deep thinkers and creative spirits. Seriously, everything about the school and its community of faculty, staff, students and parents have me enraptured and wishing that C.J. could go to The Center School or a school like it.

The school has become a safe haven for gender creative kiddos. As of next year, the school will have four transgender and two gender non-conforming students and a gender creative staff member. How cool is that? Even cooler? They just launched a Raising Rainbows Scholarship in my honor.

The Center School’s Raising Rainbows scholarship, established in 2015, provides tuition support for Center School students who are transgender, gender nonconforming, gender creative, or who have family members…

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Bullying Affects Educators As Well: The Loss of Karis Ann Ross

I’ve been doing some writing for this great blog. Check out my latest post and many other important conversations this group of educators are having.

Young Teachers Collective

By: Alexander Walker

Bullying isn’t isolated only to students at school. It affects the teachers, administrators, and staff as well. For many LGBTQ teachers this is a common occurrence.

Earlier this month, Karis Anne Ross’s mother Jill Grienke came forward to make sure Milwaukee Public Schools handle Karis Anne Rossfuture bullying situations differently. Karis was a transgender woman who was a long time special educator of the German Immersion Public School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In November 2014 she committed suicide after being bullied for years. Her own colleagues were said to have bullied her before and after her transition.

As a native Wisconsinite, a man of trans experience, and a special educator, it pains me to see another life lost within the transgender community. When I transitioned, I made a decision to keep my trans status private. One of my biggest fears was not being able to stay in the teaching profession…

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April Guest Teacher Blog

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Source: Upworthy

Meet Carrie Colpitts a good friend and fierce advocate for LGBTQ youth. Carrie is  a teacher, zine maker, and cat person.

As we work our way through April heading towards the end of the school year, consider thinking about how you can revamp your inclusion and awareness of LBTQ youth in your school.

The Power of Language, Visibility, and Advocacy

-Root your words and actions in kindness.

I use that phrase a lot, it’s always written above the board in my classroom and I say it as a gentle reminder to students.

Much of the work I do in making my classroom a safe space is done the first few days of school. The first minute, the first hour, the first day, the first week…those are extremely important times that set the tone in the classroom for the whole year. The first things on this list of ideas for making a welcoming classroom should be done on the very first days of school. Taking time to do these things will make the school year easier for every kid in your room who might need a little extra reassurance that you are committed to making a safe(r) space for them.

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Wellesley should admit trans students. Now. Here’s why.

monica byrne

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Photo: empty chairs in Houghton Chapel, Wellesley. Reunion 2013. 

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Early one spring morning in my sophomore year at Wellesley, before dawn, I was on the roof of Cazenove dormitory with my friend Ashley. We were continuing a conversation that had begun in the dining hall the previous night. We hadn’t slept.

We were arguing about gender. On this point, she was far more critical of Wellesley than I. She paced the roof, expressing her frustration the limits of our college’s touted “tolerance.”

I didn’t understand. I said, “So…you’re saying any man who gets sex reassignment surgery should also be admitted to Wellesley?”

“No,” she said firmly. “I’m saying anyone who thinks of themselves as a woman should be admitted to Wellesley.”

And with that one sentence, sex and gender unhooked in my mind as neatly as a necklace clasp.

Which is why it’s frustrating to me that, fifteen years later, my…

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