Ask Matt: Teaching Teachers About Trans Issues

A great resource from Matt Kailey on the importance of training educators on the need to trans students.

Matt Kailey's Tranifesto

Question MarkA reader writes: “I will be talking and teaching teachers about being transgender and working with them to create a safer school climate and a respectful school climate. This particular school is getting its first trans boarding student. Several teachers have asked about the other students, as in, ‘They should be told that the new student is trans’ and ‘We need to protect the trans student and we need to protect the other students.’ How would you respond to this?

“I know it takes time to get used to something unfamiliar. I also believe, even in private high schools, that teachers must leave their baggage at the door, which is hard, but we did it with big areas like religion, racism, etc. How would you help faculty see what they need to do to create not only awareness, but eventually acceptance?”

I have done Safe Schools training in the past…

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Coming Soon…..

The second project I’m beginning for this blog is a guest blog post each month from someone who works in schools to create a more inclusive classroom for LGBTQIA youth.

Here are a few previews for what’s to come next:

March: Gain an insight of how one science teacher integrates conversations about LGBTQIA youth in the classroom.

April: Tips on creating inclusive school environments and public accommodations

May: One Social Worker discusses how they engage students in essential conversations on LGBTQIA topics.

 

The Etiquette Of Pronouns When You’re Unsure

People often want to be respectful, but are unsure of what to do if they are unsure of someone’s preferred pronouns. In my post on creating an inclusive classroom I talked about the importance of this. Take a look at this clip from the show So Popular with Janet Mock discussing pronouns in terms of Bruce Jenner’s transition. Continue reading

Why Showing Trans Youth Teachers Are Supportive Is Necessary

5ways

Source: Trans Student Educational Resources

 

This post has been weighing on my mind since early December. I wrote an Op-ed for the Advocate about public accommodations in schools for students who are transgender. Think about how being treated like everyone else in school can positively affect your day? Just before and after this piece came out there were several suicides within the transgender youth community. This saddens me that these individuals are gone and didn’t have the support and resources they needed. As an educator I want students to know that there are many of us who are here to support you, listen to you, and here to help you find resources. Continue reading

How To Create An Inclusive Classroom Tip 2

Create a classroom library with books about all kinds of identities. As with any classroom library it’s a good idea to slowly add books that cover topics that students may not be familiar with. Consider highlighting some of these books as a read aloud with specific discussions or activities before adding them to your library.

Think of some ways to integrate them into a unit you teach during the school year.

One thought might be to do an identity project (developmentally appropriate for 5th or 6th graders) and use some of these books as a read aloud.

Here are 8 books for elementary (1-6 or beyond) students that include characters that are transgender, broaden the sense of gender stereotypes, or are trying to educate about diversity: Continue reading

Tips For Creating An Inclusive Classroom For Kids Who Are Trans Part 1

As we approach the end of 2014 I’m beginning a few projects for this blog. The first one will be a tips for those who work with youth on how to create a more inclusive classroom for kids who are of trans experience. To be clear I’m using the word Trans to include individuals who are genderqueer, gender variant, transgender, transexual, gender neutral, two-spirit, feminine of center, masculine of center, etc…

I’ll take this moment to highlight something. As a special educator the students I work with in the past are used to being defined by their disability. I don’t agree with this use of language and therefore use people first language. I’ll be doing the same thing when talking about young people who are of trans experience. I feel that this is an important aspect of language because someone may have this experience, but it does not completely define them.

On to the first tip! Continue reading