Friday Fodder: Raising Rainbows Scholarship

Consider supporting this scholarship fund.

Raising My Rainbow

During my travels around the nation speaking to different groups and organizations, I fell in love with a school in Greenfield, Massachusetts. The Center School is a progressive, independent day school that offers rigorous education for deep thinkers and creative spirits. Seriously, everything about the school and its community of faculty, staff, students and parents have me enraptured and wishing that C.J. could go to The Center School or a school like it.

The school has become a safe haven for gender creative kiddos. As of next year, the school will have four transgender and two gender non-conforming students and a gender creative staff member. How cool is that? Even cooler? They just launched a Raising Rainbows Scholarship in my honor.

The Center School’s Raising Rainbows scholarship, established in 2015, provides tuition support for Center School students who are transgender, gender nonconforming, gender creative, or who have family members…

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Bullying Affects Educators As Well: The Loss of Karis Ann Ross

I’ve been doing some writing for this great blog. Check out my latest post and many other important conversations this group of educators are having.

Young Teachers Collective

By: Alexander Walker

Bullying isn’t isolated only to students at school. It affects the teachers, administrators, and staff as well. For many LGBTQ teachers this is a common occurrence.

Earlier this month, Karis Anne Ross’s mother Jill Grienke came forward to make sure Milwaukee Public Schools handle Karis Anne Rossfuture bullying situations differently. Karis was a transgender woman who was a long time special educator of the German Immersion Public School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In November 2014 she committed suicide after being bullied for years. Her own colleagues were said to have bullied her before and after her transition.

As a native Wisconsinite, a man of trans experience, and a special educator, it pains me to see another life lost within the transgender community. When I transitioned, I made a decision to keep my trans status private. One of my biggest fears was not being able to stay in the teaching profession…

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Book Released!

Over the past almost two years, I’ve been working on an anthology of transmasculine experiences with a great co-editor Emmett Lundberg. We’re pleased to announce the release of:

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Cover Design by: Sheyam Ghieth

Finding Masculinity: Female to Male Transition in Adulthood, a collection of essays from a small cross section of the transgender male community that shares insight into the diversity of life experiences of transgender men, beyond the traditional narrative.

This anthology examines the many facets of life that transition impacts; transitioning on the job, emotional and spiritual growth, family, navigating the medical community, as well as romantic relationships. The true stories come from scientists, teachers, fathers, veterans, and artists who share how being visible as the masculine humans they identify as has developed, changed, and evolved their sense of masculinity.

Order the book online here: http://amzn.to/1Q1XnVG

Follow our Facebook page for events and other details : http://on.fb.me/1IP2iIW

How To Create An Inclusive Classroom Tip 3

The Bathroom Pass 

bathroom pass

Source: Pinterest

Do you remember the routine for going to the bathroom in elementary school? I sure do. It went a little something like this:

1. Raise your hand

2. Ask: May I use the bathroom?

3. If the answer was yes, walk up and grab the appropriate bathroom pass of which there were two options—-

Boys and Girls and many of them had a “gender accepted” color on them ranging in some sort of blue or pink.

My question is do we need to continue this practice? Sure, keep the bathroom pass it’s the responsibility of the teacher to know where students are. Let’s change the decision though.

Instead of having a pass with Boys and Girls written on them consider the following alternatives:

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April Guest Teacher Blog

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Source: Upworthy

Meet Carrie Colpitts a good friend and fierce advocate for LGBTQ youth. Carrie is  a teacher, zine maker, and cat person.

As we work our way through April heading towards the end of the school year, consider thinking about how you can revamp your inclusion and awareness of LBTQ youth in your school.

The Power of Language, Visibility, and Advocacy

-Root your words and actions in kindness.

I use that phrase a lot, it’s always written above the board in my classroom and I say it as a gentle reminder to students.

Much of the work I do in making my classroom a safe space is done the first few days of school. The first minute, the first hour, the first day, the first week…those are extremely important times that set the tone in the classroom for the whole year. The first things on this list of ideas for making a welcoming classroom should be done on the very first days of school. Taking time to do these things will make the school year easier for every kid in your room who might need a little extra reassurance that you are committed to making a safe(r) space for them.

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March Teacher Guest Blog

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This post begins the monthly guest education blogger. I want to thank this blogger for their awareness and dedication to integrating diversity in student identities to their conversations in science class.

Teaching Biology Beyond XX and XY 

Regardless of what subject you teach, education is, by default, political. As educators, we make choices to expose students to certain information, and it is our responsibility to provide accurate and thorough access to a variety of ideas. We must recognize that students come to us with a wide range of experiences and that all students, regardless of their backgrounds, deserve to be respected and to hear their own stories echoed within the classroom.

In my science classroom, I specifically aim to empower students to become scientifically responsible global citizens who can make educated decisions about their roles in the world. Students will often debate about climate change or the evidence for evolution, but sometimes it is more personal: when learning about heredity, a student might begin to wonder what genetic traits his or her child will have.  Continue reading

Ask Matt: Teaching Teachers About Trans Issues

A great resource from Matt Kailey on the importance of training educators on the need to trans students.

Matt Kailey's Tranifesto

Question MarkA reader writes: “I will be talking and teaching teachers about being transgender and working with them to create a safer school climate and a respectful school climate. This particular school is getting its first trans boarding student. Several teachers have asked about the other students, as in, ‘They should be told that the new student is trans’ and ‘We need to protect the trans student and we need to protect the other students.’ How would you respond to this?

“I know it takes time to get used to something unfamiliar. I also believe, even in private high schools, that teachers must leave their baggage at the door, which is hard, but we did it with big areas like religion, racism, etc. How would you help faculty see what they need to do to create not only awareness, but eventually acceptance?”

I have done Safe Schools training in the past…

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